Sunday, February 9, 2014
Baseball photo by my dad, early ’80s.

Baseball photo by my dad, early ’80s.

A six year old self portrait.

A six year old self portrait.

Wednesday, February 5, 2014

shoobopsoultown:

"Boy Trouble" - The Rev-Lons

Rough and garagey girl group pop from 1962 — on the complete other end of the spectrum from Phil Spector’s perfected wall of sound. This song is suitably sassy, and of course the girls were from California — Bakersfield to be exact. This is a tune made for playing a few times in a row until you start imitating the snarling vocal and find yourself doodling “ban boys” in flowery letters. The Rev-Lons knew what was up is all I’m saying.

Real fav right here. 

Monday, February 3, 2014
hey
Thursday, January 30, 2014
theatlantic:

Forgotify: The Tool for Discovering Spotify’s 4 Million Unheard Tracks

The idea first came to Lane Jordan when he heard an odd little fact: Around 20 percent of tracks on Spotify—some four million songs—had been played exactly zero times.
Four million songs! That got Jordan thinking. What were those songs? And don’t they, too, deserve a little listening?
Jordan brought the idea to his friend, J Hausmann, and together, along with the help of a third friend (Nate Gagnon), they built Forgotify, a discovery engine for Spotify’s unplayed tracks.
Forgotify is built upon a database that the trio created to crawl Spotify’s API for pieces with a play count of zero. Once a song has been played, it disappears from the site, rendering it oddly reminiscent of an old, archival audio cassette which, once played, may never play again. Playing it destroys it. (Except, of course, in the case of Forgotify, the songs still live on in Spotify proper.)
Read more. [Image: flattop341/Flickr]


I like this.

theatlantic:

Forgotify: The Tool for Discovering Spotify’s 4 Million Unheard Tracks

The idea first came to Lane Jordan when he heard an odd little fact: Around 20 percent of tracks on Spotifysome four million songs—had been played exactly zero times.

Four million songs! That got Jordan thinking. What were those songs? And don’t they, too, deserve a little listening?

Jordan brought the idea to his friend, J Hausmann, and together, along with the help of a third friend (Nate Gagnon), they built Forgotify, a discovery engine for Spotify’s unplayed tracks.

Forgotify is built upon a database that the trio created to crawl Spotify’s API for pieces with a play count of zero. Once a song has been played, it disappears from the site, rendering it oddly reminiscent of an old, archival audio cassette which, once played, may never play again. Playing it destroys it. (Except, of course, in the case of Forgotify, the songs still live on in Spotify proper.)

Read more. [Image: flattop341/Flickr]

I like this.

vintagebrides:

1967 Austin, Texas newlyweds at the champagne fountain.

vintagebrides:

1967 Austin, Texas newlyweds at the champagne fountain.

Tuesday, January 28, 2014
shoobopsoultown:


“I Could Write A Book" - Bobbie Smith & The Dream Girls
A wonderful girl group that never quite made it out of Detroit, Bobbie Smith & The Dream Girls recorded great song after great song for the Twirl Records label after being discovered by Irving Micahnik and Harry Balk in 1959. Bobbie Smith’s voice is really special, girlie sweetness blended seamlessly with a gritty and raw power that most punk frontmen would die for. Maron McKenzie, a Detroit factory worker trying to make it in the music business, wrote this particular song for The Supremes but he was rejected by Barry Gordy and he brought it to the Twirl offices. The girls did an amazing job with this classic pop jam, as you can hear if your ears work. 
As for why The Dream Girls never made it big? Balk said he doesn’t know why. “As good as they were, it just never happened. I don’t know why, because they were a great group.” This song’s writer McKenzie (who became very successful in his own right) had a different theory  “I think that Irving didn’t want Bobbie to become successful. I honestly think she had the voice, she had the stage presence, she had a great batch of songs to work with, but Irving had this thing for Bobbie, and I think he didn’t want her to achieve success. You know, to spread her wings and leave him. I can’t say for sure but those are my thoughts.”

this song is literally perfect by the way

shoobopsoultown:

I Could Write A Book" - Bobbie Smith & The Dream Girls

A wonderful girl group that never quite made it out of Detroit, Bobbie Smith & The Dream Girls recorded great song after great song for the Twirl Records label after being discovered by Irving Micahnik and Harry Balk in 1959. Bobbie Smith’s voice is really special, girlie sweetness blended seamlessly with a gritty and raw power that most punk frontmen would die for. Maron McKenzie, a Detroit factory worker trying to make it in the music business, wrote this particular song for The Supremes but he was rejected by Barry Gordy and he brought it to the Twirl offices. The girls did an amazing job with this classic pop jam, as you can hear if your ears work. 

As for why The Dream Girls never made it big? Balk said he doesn’t know why. “As good as they were, it just never happened. I don’t know why, because they were a great group.” This song’s writer McKenzie (who became very successful in his own right) had a different theory  “I think that Irving didn’t want Bobbie to become successful. I honestly think she had the voice, she had the stage presence, she had a great batch of songs to work with, but Irving had this thing for Bobbie, and I think he didn’t want her to achieve success. You know, to spread her wings and leave him. I can’t say for sure but those are my thoughts.”

this song is literally perfect by the way

Monday, January 27, 2014
lustnspace:

The Ronettes


My girlsssss

lustnspace:

The Ronettes

My girlsssss

peoplewithcats:

Jane Fonda

peoplewithcats:

Jane Fonda

shoobopsoultown:


“As Long As I’ve Got You" - Danny Hernandez & The Ones
Just the most sincerely pumped celebration of love in the face of a confusing and shitty world. I listen to this unironic, optimistic soul-garage jam whenever I’m having a bad day and it makes me feel better. The band was a teen group from Lansing, Michigan who had their biggest hit in 1967 after their independent (and much cooler (but I’m pretty uncool)) single “You Haven’t Seen My Love" was picked up by the big dawgs at Motown Records. Anyway, look at how fly Danny Hernandez and his pals are up there. Would have definitely hung out with these guys over anyone else in Michigan in 1970.

these dudes could get it

shoobopsoultown:

As Long As I’ve Got You" - Danny Hernandez & The Ones

Just the most sincerely pumped celebration of love in the face of a confusing and shitty world. I listen to this unironic, optimistic soul-garage jam whenever I’m having a bad day and it makes me feel better. The band was a teen group from Lansing, Michigan who had their biggest hit in 1967 after their independent (and much cooler (but I’m pretty uncool)) single “You Haven’t Seen My Love" was picked up by the big dawgs at Motown Records. Anyway, look at how fly Danny Hernandez and his pals are up there. Would have definitely hung out with these guys over anyone else in Michigan in 1970.

these dudes could get it

whiskeyboat:

wtvrmaycome:

Moist.

I lost my fucking shirt when he said this.

I’ve literally never seen my boyfriend laugh as hard as he did in this moment.

(Source: samanthapanther)

patruby:

image

my favorite NBA play ever [dot] gif

Sunday, January 26, 2014
shoobopsoultown:


“Breakaway" - Irma Thomas
My preference for b-sides over the original singles is starting to seem a bit like the retro version of the hipster refrain of “their first album is their best one,” but it’s genuine. There’s so much care put into making a single sound perfectly produced and catchy and shiny enough to be played on the radio, and it often feels like the real heart of an artist is found on side b. This is certainly true of “Breakaway,” the b-side to New Orleans’ soul queen Irma Thomas’s biggest hit, “Wish Someone Would Care.” Thomas never reached the levels of fame that she deserved, but she has a gorgeous range that was often used suitably to bring emotional weight to ballads. “Ruler of my Heart” is probably my favorite song of hers in that vein, but “Breakaway” (written by Jackie DeShannon and Sharon Sheeley) is something else entirely. It’s a catchy floor filler for any sock hop, and also a heartbreaking explanation of what it’s like to be in an abusive relationship that you want to leave but just… can’t. “Breakaway” pairs poignant lyrics with an exhaustingly fast-paced soundtrack. Once you’ve listened to it a couple times you’ll spend the rest of your life waiting for the DJs to wise up and play it so you can skip to the dance floor and sweat through your gingham sundress in excitement.

B-side… more like ME-side, amiright?!?!

shoobopsoultown:

Breakaway" - Irma Thomas

My preference for b-sides over the original singles is starting to seem a bit like the retro version of the hipster refrain of “their first album is their best one,” but it’s genuine. There’s so much care put into making a single sound perfectly produced and catchy and shiny enough to be played on the radio, and it often feels like the real heart of an artist is found on side b. This is certainly true of “Breakaway,” the b-side to New Orleans’ soul queen Irma Thomas’s biggest hit, “Wish Someone Would Care.” Thomas never reached the levels of fame that she deserved, but she has a gorgeous range that was often used suitably to bring emotional weight to ballads. “Ruler of my Heart” is probably my favorite song of hers in that vein, but “Breakaway” (written by Jackie DeShannon and Sharon Sheeley) is something else entirely. It’s a catchy floor filler for any sock hop, and also a heartbreaking explanation of what it’s like to be in an abusive relationship that you want to leave but just… can’t. “Breakaway” pairs poignant lyrics with an exhaustingly fast-paced soundtrack. Once you’ve listened to it a couple times you’ll spend the rest of your life waiting for the DJs to wise up and play it so you can skip to the dance floor and sweat through your gingham sundress in excitement.

B-side… more like ME-side, amiright?!?!

<3

<3

Friday, January 24, 2014
shoobopsoultown:


“Everyday, Pt. 1" - Abraham &amp; The Casanovas
Gorgeous soul ballad from Shreveport, Louisiana’s Murco Records. I couldn’t find out much of anything about Abraham, who wrote this great song which was actually unreleased and surfaced on the Murco Records’ compilation “Shreveport Southern Soul.” It’s hard to believe that such a beautiful song never made it onto vinyl, but I’m so glad I get to listen to it (20 times in a row, some nights) now. It’s about keeping unrealistic fantasies in check and keeping expectations on earth — “everyday ain’t gonna be like milk and honey, now.” 

Pretty.

shoobopsoultown:

Everyday, Pt. 1" - Abraham & The Casanovas

Gorgeous soul ballad from Shreveport, Louisiana’s Murco Records. I couldn’t find out much of anything about Abraham, who wrote this great song which was actually unreleased and surfaced on the Murco Records’ compilation “Shreveport Southern Soul.” It’s hard to believe that such a beautiful song never made it onto vinyl, but I’m so glad I get to listen to it (20 times in a row, some nights) now. It’s about keeping unrealistic fantasies in check and keeping expectations on earth — “everyday ain’t gonna be like milk and honey, now.” 

Pretty.